Wednesday, June 14

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality: A Book Review


Emotionally Healthy Spirituality by Peter Scazzero

I wasn't sure I wanted to read this book, but after a friend raved about, I figured I would give it a shot. The premise of this book is that you can't be spiritually mature while remaining emotional immature. Born out of a season where the author noticed this in himself and then started seeing it in churches across the country, this book outlines his journey and shares the signs of emotionally unhealthy spirituality. One of the things he noticed was himself using God to run from God. I think that's the part of the book description that drew me in the most - the fact that the author could admit that about himself. I've seen that play out greatly in several of my relationships.

There's a reason this book has sold more than 250,000 copies. It's well written, full of good things (I mean, very good things), not skirting the real issue of spiritual feebleness and what to do about it if you see it in yourself. Like the friend who recommended it to me as a good book to pick up, I will in return recommend it to you!


Disclaimer: This book was provided to me free of charge by BookLook Bloggers in exchange for my honest review. All the opinions expressed are completely my own. Also, affiliate links used. This means that if you purchase a book via the Amazon links, I'll receive a small percentage. Thank you for supporting my blog!

Labels: ,

Tuesday, June 13

The Physics of Everyday Things: A Book Review



I had really high hopes for this book, but in the end, was disappointed with it. The author is a physics professor set out to reveal the mind-bending sciences behind the seemingly basic things that keep our daily lives running, from our smart phones to x-ray machine to airplanes. I thought the concept of this book was incredibly intriguing! I want to learn about the physics of those things.

Perhaps part of the problem was with my expectation of this book. I expected illustrations or layman's depictions of the physics behind each item the author was describing. Instead, there were only a few illustrations while the rest of the book described things in words only. That made the book very hard for me - a very non-science type person - to understand what the author was saying and describing.

All in all, I don't recommend this book to people without a science background.


Disclaimer: This book was provided to me free of charge by Blogging for Books in exchange for my honest review. All the opinions expressed are completely my own. Also, affiliate links used. This means that if you purchase a book via the Amazon links, I'll receive a small percentage. Thank you for supporting my blog!

Labels: ,

Wednesday, June 7

Real Artists Don't Starve: A Book Review



Frankly, I wasn't sure that I wanted to read this book. It's nothing against Jeff Goins as an author - I've read one of his books and enjoyed not only the content but also his writing style. This book seemed interesting too; however, how many books can a person read about improving themselves, selling their product, developing their dream, marketing themselves, etc. before it's simply too much information. And like I said, I wasn't sure that I wanted to read this book all because I wanted to push pause on how much information I was consuming to focus on "doing."

But then I started to see the snippets of the "12 rules of new renaissance" that Goins was sharing on Instagram and I was intrigued. Things like "The Starving Artist despises the need for money. The Thriving Artist makes money to make more art." In this book, Goins sets out to dismantle the myth that being creative is a hindrance to success by revealing how an artist temperament is in fact a competitive advantage in the marketplace. He talks about how creative individuals throughout history didn't suffer to create their art, but capitalized on the power of their creative strength.

I am quite glad I picked up this book, and didn't pass on it because I was mentally tired of taking in more information about what I should be doing, need to do or could be making time for. Goins has a relate-able writing style. He kept me on my toes as I was reading, constantly underlining or making notes in the margins. I give it a very big two thumbs up!


Disclaimer: This book was provided to me free of charge by BookLook Bloggers in exchange for my honest review. All the opinions expressed are completely my own. Also, affiliate links used. This means that if you purchase a book via the Amazon links, I'll receive a small percentage. Thank you for supporting my blog!

Labels: ,

Sunday, June 4

Roadfood: A Book Review


Roadfood by Jane and Michael Stern

I have been dying to get my hands on this guide to all the best eats throughout the United States! It's arrived, and it's awesome! I plan to stick it in my car for road trips or even impromptu trips, or better still for seeking out the hidden gems when we travel back and forth to both of our parents' homes.

The book itself is gorgeous. Very well designed. It's broken into sections of the country, and includes maps of the areas the book is describing so you can easily open it open, find what area of the country you're currently in (or headed to) and then identity what restaurants are on your way to your destination. On a page after the area map, the book describes what the restaurants are known for along with their address (duh!) and phone number.

I can't wait to use this guide to over 1,000 of the best local hot spots and hidden gems across America!


Disclaimer: This book was provided to me free of charge by Blogging for Books in exchange for my honest review. All the opinions expressed are completely my own. Also, affiliate links used. This means that if you purchase a book via the Amazon links, I'll receive a small percentage. Thank you for supporting my blog!

Labels: ,

Friday, June 2


The Gospel According to Paul by John MacArthur

I haven't read a lot of John MacArthur's books, but thought I'd give this one a shot. Lately, I've been stuck in an easy-read type pattern, and knowing that this would be a heavier, thought provoking book where I'd have to pay attention was a bit daunting.

In this book, MacArthur dives into part of the New Testament books that Paul wrote to the early church and how these key texts have a unique emphasis highlighting some essential aspects of the Gospel. The book is about 250 pages, and while packed with great information, was a fairly quick read for me. MacArthur did a good job of using phrases and words that the average person could understand (and not too "scholarly" or with phrases that minsters and Christian often educators use when talking about the early church), while still tackling very key and very heavy parts of the Gospel and his writings to the early church. I found this book educational, and like I said above a quick read; however, you definitely have to be in the mood to pay attention (unlike an easy fiction book).


Disclaimer: This book was provided to me free of charge by BookLook Bloggers in exchange for my honest review. All the opinions expressed are completely my own. Also, affiliate links used. This means that if you purchase a book via the Amazon links, I'll receive a small percentage. Thank you for supporting my blog!

Labels: ,